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Welcome to the Computer Engineering Program

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UCR's Virtual Graduate Open House Week

Computer Engineering Graduate Open House Session
Thursday, October 15 at 3:00 p.m. 

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Statement of Solidarity

The faculty of the Computer Engineering Program expresses support to our Black  community, and stands with them against social injustice and racism.  We commit to listening, learning, and striving to create an environment where Black students, faculty, and staff are treated with compassion and respect.  The program wholeheartedly supports the statement and plan of action outlined in the Bourns College of Engineering solidarity statement. Read the statement here

 

"Computing is fueling a revolution that has changed how we live, work, interact and play. Advances continue at an exciting pace with breakthroughs driven by computing at all scales: from massive data being analyzed by warehouse scale computers, providing insights into science and medicine, to embedded devices integrated within our living spaces and infrastructure.”

Program Rankings & Industry Outlook

No. 52
Public Engineering College in the U.S. (U.S. News, 2021)
No. 1
Most Transformative University (Money Magazine, 2020)
12th
Average Research Area Ranking (CS Rankings)
1.4 Million
CEN Occupations (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2018)
$117K
Median salary for Hardware Engineers (Bureau of Labor Statistics)
$105K
Median salary for Software Engineers (Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Recent News

NSF grant on distributed multi-robot joint localization and tracking
Professor Wei Ren received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant on distributed multi-robot joint localization and tracking. In applications such as disaster response, a network of mobile autonomous robots collectively tracks a subject over a wide area in an intermittently GPS-denied environment. As the subject and the robots move in and out of observation and communication range, each robot in the network needs to propagate estimates of position, velocity, and orientation for both itself and the subject, based on noisy measurements. This project aims to address distributed joint
Read More »aboutNSF grant on distributed multi-robot joint localization and tracking
Hung-Wei Tseng awarded NSF grant to better utilize tensor processors
Professor Hung-Wei Tseng has received a 495K grant from National Science Foundation’s Division of Computer and Network Systems to explore application designs on Tensor Processing Units (TPUs). TPUs are emerging, commercialized accelerators for neural networks. Despite the current focus on NN models, the microarchitecture of TPUs have potential in accelerating many other tensor-based, high-dimensional algorithms. This project will build an infrastructure, including runtime system, programming languages and computer architectures, that allows TPUs’ processing model to accelerate a wider spectrum
Read More »aboutHung-Wei Tseng awarded NSF grant to better utilize tensor processors
Balandin and Kargar receive NSF MRI Grant to Develop a Unique Spectroscopy Facility at UCR
Alexander Balandin, distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering, and Fariborz Kargar, adjunct assistant professor, both of the Marlan and Rosemary Bourns College of Engineering (BCOE), received Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) funding of $741,000 from the National Science Foundation to develop a unique spectroscopy facility at the University of California, Riverside’s (UCR) Phonon Optimized Engineering Materials (POEM) Center. The project, “MRI: Development of a Cryogenic Integrated Micro-Raman-Brillouin-Mandelstam Spectrometer,” aims to build an integrated micro-Raman
Read More »aboutBalandin and Kargar receive NSF MRI Grant to Develop a Unique Spectroscopy Facility at UCR
Shaolei Ren awarded NSF grant to automate design of deep neural networks
Professor Shaolei Ren received a National Science Foundation grant to study automated design of deep neural networks (DNNs) for edge inference. Edge devices, such as mobile phones, drones and robots, have been emerging as an increasingly more important platform for DNN inference. But, designing an optimal DNN model for maximizing the users' quality of experience (QoE) is significantly challenged by the high degree of heterogeneity in edge devices and constantly-changing usage scenarios. Moreover, the existing approaches focus on optimizing a certain objective metric for edge inference, which
Read More »aboutShaolei Ren awarded NSF grant to automate design of deep neural networks
plastic bottle waste
Upcycling plastic waste toward sustainable energy storage
Simple process transforms PET plastic into a nanomaterial for energy storage
Read More »aboutUpcycling plastic waste toward sustainable energy storage
ECE and CSE faculty receive new DARPA grant on adversarial machine learning
ECE Professor Amit Roy-Chowdhury is leading a team of ECE and CSE faculty that has received a grant totaling almost $1 million from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, to understand the vulnerability of computer vision systems to adversarial attacks. The project is part of the Machine Vision Disruption program, which is part of DARPA’s AI Explorations program. The results could have broad applications in autonomous vehicles, surveillance, and national defense. Team members include UC Riverside colleagues Srikanth Krishnamurthy, Chengyu Song, Salman Asif, and Xerox
Read More »aboutECE and CSE faculty receive new DARPA grant on adversarial machine learning
An intersection near the entrance to UCR
UC Riverside computer scientists receive grant to improve security of visual artificial intelligence
Amit Roy-Chowdhury leads project that will develop robust context-aware machine vision for computers
Read More »aboutUC Riverside computer scientists receive grant to improve security of visual artificial intelligence
Haberer awarded NSF grant to study self-propelled nanomaterials
Professor Elaine Haberer received a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to study synthetic nanoswimmers. These remarkable self-propelled materials can convert chemical or light energy into locomotion, increasing mixing and accelerating chemical reactions. Asymmetry in particle composition enables movement through a local build-up of reaction products, while particle size and geometry control speed and directionality. The funded project will use the expert manufacturing capabilities of viruses to overcome fabrication challenges that have stymied the production of sub-100 nm devices. The bio
Read More »aboutHaberer awarded NSF grant to study self-propelled nanomaterials